Thursday, June 16, 2016

Gearing up for a New Year of Sharing with #GMTTC

Are you a connected educator?

Do you enjoy connecting your students to share in the learning?

Then have we got a challenge for you!

The Global Math Task Twitter Challenge (@globalmathtask) is entering it's second full year of sharing! We'd love to have you join in the fun and connect with us!

We are looking for students/homeschoolers/classes/teachers of all ages, all over the world, to participate in this year’s Global Math Task Twitter Challenge starting in the fall of 2016.
If you follow Beverly Ladd (@bevery_ladd) or Heidi Samuelson (@swampfrogkids) on Twitter, you might have seen us tweeting math problems and tasks for other classes to answer. We want to expand on our experiences and share them with you! We think we've created a fantastic way for teachers all over the globe to connect and do the same through @globalmathtask.
You can join in the challenge at any time! Just follow the hashtag for your grade(age) level and respond to tasks being shared out. For instance if you want to look at the tasks being shared by fourth graders, search the hashtag #gmttc4. Find a task you’d like your students to solve. Then share out your solution using the same hashtag so that others can comment and connect to share their thoughts as well.

We Need/ LOVE to have classes/teachers sign up for a week to tweet tasks during the 2016-17 school year. It’s easy to do and we promise to help as much as we can to make your tweets and challenges as successful as they can be! Just sign up for a week (or two or three) to dedicate your time/students/classes to sharing tasks of the math skills you're working on during that week.

You can share tasks as a picture, words, GIFs, videos, (either generated by you or your students) or knock our socks off and come up with something unique to share the task!

What you’ll need: a personal or class Twitter Account and a device to share your tweets with the world. Make sure to follow the appropriate hashtag for your grade(age) level because questions could be posted at anytime from anywhere around the world.
Also be sure to follow @globlamathtask on Twitter for updates and shares throughout the year.

When you tweet a math task, be sure to include the hashtag. If you tag @globalmathtask in your tweet,  we can retweet your task to help you share your learning with other classes.

We understand that some countries have different conversions and systems when it comes to money and measurement. If you chose to tweet measurement problems, please be aware that not all countries will be able to participate or it can be taken as an additional challenge to teach your students to convert them.

We’ll start the challenge at the beginning of September 2016 and go until the beginning of May 2017. Be brave! Sign up for a week or two now. We’ll send a reminder email (and text) before your week to give you time to prepare for your tweeting of the tasks!

Click HERE to sign up on the spreadsheet to share
your very own math tasks with other classes!

We’re also starting a NEW challenge this year: #gmttc24!
If you’ve ever played the card game 24, you know the premise
…four numbers will be tweeted out at the beginning of the week with the hashtag #gmttc24.
The challenge will be to come up with as many ways as you possibly can to use all of the numbers to create the number 24. You can add, multiply, subtract, and divide.
The goal for the challenge will be to have classes use the week's numbers to come up with
(and share out on twitter)
as many different number combinations to create the number 24.
One class would be in charge of keeping track of the different solutions to see which week has the most different combinations. This will be great practice for students around the world to share their thinking as they share the different solution combinations!

Lastly, if you would like to receive RemindHQ notifications about the Global Math Task Twitter Challenge please follow these steps.
To receive messages via text, text @gmathc to 81010.
You can opt-out of messages at anytime by replying, 'unsubscribe @gmathc'.
Trouble using 81010? Try texting @gmathc to (917) 746-0412 instead.
Or to receive messages via email, send an email to
To unsubscribe, reply with 'unsubscribe' in the subject line.

Please contact Beverly, @bevladd ,or Heidi, @swampfrogfirst, if you have any questions.
For more information, follow our blogl

Sunday, May 1, 2016

#gmttc + Writing Challenge

We're putting out a ‪#‎gmttc‬ + Writing challenge to all the wonderful classes
 that have participated and shared the learning this year! 
We'd LOVE to see the #gmttc twitter feed "blow up" with 
students' thoughts about participating in the 
Global Math Task Twitter Challenge this year. 
You can download a free template to help your students 
compose their tweets here:

Thanks for joining us on this journey! 
We hope to see you next year as we take the challenge 
to connect our students to share the learning with math tasks again!
Beverly & Heidi

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Math Awareness Month Article for TenMarks

Originally posted on on 4/10/2016

Math Awareness Month
Beyond the Standards

by Beverly Ladd, 2nd Grade Teacher, NC and Heidi Samuelson, 4th Grade Teacher, TN

            Did you know April is Mathematics Awareness Month? The goal of Mathematics Awareness Month is to increase appreciation and understanding of math. As we reflect on math during this time, we are struck by one particular aspect of the subject: Getting the right answer is not always what math is about. More than the right answer is the journey students embark on as they strive to learn a new skill or solve a task. The importance of math goes beyond the day-to-day standards that we teach. Often, the most important part of math is what is not written on a lesson plan at all. Often, the important part of math is in the connections, communications, and commitment to work toward a goal.
           As teachers, we strive for students not only to get the right answers, but also to develop a growth mindset when they make a mistake. Helping a child internalize that making mistakes is part of learning gives them the opportunity to understand that the mistakes they make are proof of learning. Creating this growth mindset in our students is vital to helping them become better learners, as well as developing a sense of determination.
Empathy and Respect
          Students who work together in a collaborative learning environment gain social and emotional skills that are priceless and will allow them to be used in careers that haven’t been created or thought of yet. These are skills they will use not only in their everyday lives, but also as they work in other skill subject areas.
Often, a student working with a student that has the wrong answer will instill empathy because they have the opportunity to guide and teach the struggling student on how to get the right answer.
Students can also learn with others beyond the walls of the classroom. This builds empathy as they learn to appreciate cultural differences while developing math skills and seeing life from a different viewpoint. Breaking down classroom walls to initiate student collaboration and learning can happen in a variety of methods: Skype, students tweeting from a Twitter classroom account to participate in the Global Math Task Twitter Challenge (@globalmathtask) or in a collaborative online document. The method and frequency can vary, depending on the comfort level of the teacher and the technology resources available, but learning outside the classroom walls is beneficial for all involved!
Critical Thinking
           Learning with other students in a collaborative learning environment allows students to carry their math conversations and observations outside the structured “math lesson,” granting math talk to be blended throughout the day. More connections and deeper relationships are discovered, which helps students respond to the mathematical thinking of others, not just in their classroom, but also globally. Critical thinking is continually developed as students look deeper at the different ways in which students from across the globe are solving and sharing math tasks.
          In order for students to develop reasoning skills, students need multiple opportunities to practice communicating in math. Challenging students to use both written and verbal methods of communication gives them more opportunities to justify answers. Many times, students gain another viewpoint or method on how to solve a task while listening to other students justify answers to show their thinking. Students must learn to use appropriate vocabulary terms when explaining their thinking. Solutions must be presented in a clear “voice” when sharing with a global audience. This helps everyone develop better communication skills and become more confident mathematicians, not only today, but also years from now when they are no longer in a classroom.
          Developing lifelong learners is a goal that every teacher dreams about. We want the students in our classroom to build their own curiosity and interests through discussions, lessons, and activities they have experienced while with us. Using math to spark the imagination and help mold the developing skills of our students, teachers strive to help our students leave our classrooms with more than just what was written in our daily lesson plan book. Let’s endeavor to spark curiosity and desire in our students towards collaborating, communicating, and respecting others even though they may look and talk differently. Allowing collaborative learning environments can potently change the way our students learn to develop necessary skills, like respect and empathy for others. Let’s inspire our students to treasure the differences that make us unique, as well as to help them see how math can be a common factor for all of us during Math Awareness Month, and always!

Click Here to read the whole article on TenMarks.

Saturday, January 23, 2016

How Are You Connecting? #gmttc

How are you connecting your students to share the learning?

Are you a #gmttc participant? 
Snag the image above to put on your social media page 
or blog!

We'd love to know more 
about how you're connecting 
your students to 
share the learning 
beyond the walls of your classroom! 

Do you use padlets? 
Click on this one and add in your answer to the task in the black at the top of the chalkboard style background. We'd love more interaction on how you might solve this task!

Are you videoing and sharing on youtube?

Do you create images with your Students to send out tasks?

Are you using google slides?
Click on the slide below or HERE 
to add your own slide to share the learning

Please share how you connect! 
We'd love to learn more ways!


Friday, January 1, 2016

Here's to Making New Connections in 2016

Looking forward to connecting with new classes to share in the learning in 2016.

Join in the fun!

You don't have to sign up to play along...just search the Twitter hashtag for your grade level to find math task challenges...
Then solve the tasks and tweet out your answer (be sure to include the hashtag)
Kindergarten = #gmttck
First Grade = #gmttc1
Second Grade = #gmttc2
Third Grade = #gmttc3
Fourth Grade = #gmttc4
Fifth Grade = #gmttc5
Middle School = #gmttcms
High School = #gmttchs

How are you connecting your students to share in the learning?

Thursday, December 24, 2015

Ways to Connect wtih #gmttc

During #EdCampVoxer, I learned about a way to connect with other classrooms using a padlet.

I've used padlets in the past, but wondering how it might look to use a padlet for #gmttc?

Here's a test padlet. I hope you'll take a moment and see how it might work for your class to connect with others. Appreciate the help!

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Connect in 2016 - Sign up today!

Sign up to connect your class beyond the building walls and share the learning globally!

Click HERE to choose a week that you can help tweet out some math tasks to share in your learning during the new year!

No spots left? Not sure how to tweet a task? No worries! Just type in your grade level hashtag on the Twitter search bar... (#gmttck = kindergarten) (#gmttc1 = first grade) (#gmttc2 = second grade)...etc.

You can see the top tweets that have been chosen in the category you're searching or you can click on live and see the most recent tweets with the hashtag you've chosen.

 Then you check out the math tasks to challenge your students to solve. Some teachers take a screen shot of the math task to project on their board for students to solve during a short 5 minute transition time. Others use the screenshot of the task to send out in a remind text to their class. The class solves the task at home and returns it the next day to choose the answer they want to tweet back. Still others are using googledocs and adding the task to a googledoc for students to solve and share back on Twitter.

How will you connect?

We'd love to hear how your class uses the Global Math Task Twitter Challenge! 
Contact Beverly Ladd or Heidi Samuelson to share your ideas!

Don't forget to follow our Twitter Account for #gmttc